October 25, 2009

Florida health officials craft H1N1 plans barring needy patients

The following story posted six days ago on Digital Journal takes on more importance now that President Barack Obama has declared a H1N1 swine flu pandemic national emergency in the United States.

Digital Journal: As the H1N1 swine flu pandemic stretches further into the North American ecology, Florida's health officials craft a plan that would bar certain patients from being admitted to hospitals across the state. . . . As the H1N1 swine flu pandemic stretches further into the North American ecology, Florida's health officials craft a plan that would bar certain patients from being admitted to hospitals across the state. The H1N1 swine flu pandemic continues to make headlines across the United States - and now the focus centers on planning and on infrastructure, after it was disclosed that more than 86 children have died from swine flu complications and that vaccines face manufacturing and distribution delays.

State health officials in Florida are now assembling their own contingency plans. Under recommendations drawn up by Florida Surgeon General Ana M. Viamonte Ros, many terminal and end-stage patients would be turned away from hospitals most affected by the swine flu pandemic - as scant resources would need to be redirected to the infected populations in need. The care rationing plan would also give doctors the authority to remove terminal patients from ventilator machines and redistribute those machines to patients who are struggling with the H1N1 swine flu virus. The decision to remove ventilators would be made by hospital administrators and would override patient family protests. . . . [Full Story]

No comments: